April 28, 2014
kateoplis:

"So this happened on my flight back home to Austin. Nature, you are beautiful when you get angry."
jtotheizzoe

kateoplis:

"So this happened on my flight back home to Austin. Nature, you are beautiful when you get angry."

jtotheizzoe

(via proletarianinstinct)

April 27, 2014

merzbow-derek:

Miroslav Tichy was an eccentric. He was held prisoner for almost a decade in Soviet labor camps just for that—being an eccentric, falsely accused of dissidence.

Upon his release in the early 70s, he wandered his small town in rags pursuing his voyeuristic obsession with the female form by photographing women unawares in the streets, shops and parks, through windows and fences, with cameras he fashioned out of tin cans, children’s eyeglass lenses and other junk he picked up while wandering. 

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via illuncensored)

April 22, 2014

hhobbess:

self portrait, los angeles

april 2014

(via terroristbakesale)

April 20, 2014

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Nicolas Evariste

Against Wind and Tide

Normandy, France

Via

April 19, 2014

aubreylstallard:

David MaiselBlack Maps, 1985

(Source: pleoros, via titaaa)

April 16, 2014
earthandanimals:

vkorone:

Alligator© Beth & Jeremy Jonkman

I am almost positive this is a caiman 

earthandanimals:

vkorone:

Alligator
© Beth & Jeremy Jonkman

I am almost positive this is a caiman 

April 10, 2014

dxo:

grofjardanhazy:

The Packard factory of Detroit, Michigan – the largest (3.5 million square foot complex on 35 acres of land) abandoned factory ever.

The buildings were built in 1903 and the company went bankrupt in the late 1950s.

These interactive photos are coming from Detroit Free Press. GIFs were made by grofjardanhazy.

Wow.

March 29, 2014
tumblropenarts:

Artist Name: Todd Behrendt
Tumblr: http://trbehrendt.tumblr.com/

tumblropenarts:

Artist Name: Todd Behrendt

Tumblr: http://trbehrendt.tumblr.com/

March 17, 2014

odditiesoflife:

This 3200 Year Old Tree is So Massive, It’s Never Been Captured in a Single Image…Until Now

It takes a special kind of tree to have a nickname like “The President”. The giant sequoia stands 247 feet tall and is an estimated 3,200 years old. The trunk measures 27 feet across and, between the base and the highest peak, there are an estimated two billion needles.

Until now, the tree had never been photographed in its entirety. A team of photographers from National Geographic worked with scientists from California’s Sequoia National Park to try to be the first.

It took an intricate set of pulleys and levers to scale the tree, which one scientist argues is the largest in the world (if you take into account width). After stitching together 126 separate photos, we are left with this mind-blowing portrait of “The President” captured in a single photo for the first time.

(Source: distractify.com, via thescienceofreality)

February 26, 2014
lostateminor:

>
Black hole photography by Fabian Oefner

‘Black Hole’ is a series by Swiss photographer Fabian Oefner, in which science basically does its best Jackson Pollock impression, creating these vibrant and colourful swirls. The process is pretty clever and simple: Oefner slaps on dabs of paint on the tip of a rod that’s connected to a drill. He then activates the drill, letting centrifugal force fling the paint outward while a camera captures it all.
Everything happens really quick, and the key to capturing it all on film in a little innovation developed by the Swiss photographer. Fabian explains it further, ‘The motion of the paint happens in a blink of an eye, the images you see are taken only millisecond after the drill was turned on. To capture the moment, where the paint forms that distinctive shape, I connected a sensor to the drill, which sends an impulse to the flashes. These specialized units are capable of creating flashes as short as a 1/40000 of a second, freezing the motion of the paint’.
Wait a minute, shouldn’t black holes be called rainbow holes if they started looking like these?

lostateminor:

>

Black hole photography by Fabian Oefner

image

‘Black Hole’ is a series by Swiss photographer Fabian Oefner, in which science basically does its best Jackson Pollock impression, creating these vibrant and colourful swirls. The process is pretty clever and simple: Oefner slaps on dabs of paint on the tip of a rod that’s connected to a drill. He then activates the drill, letting centrifugal force fling the paint outward while a camera captures it all.

Everything happens really quick, and the key to capturing it all on film in a little innovation developed by the Swiss photographer. Fabian explains it further, ‘The motion of the paint happens in a blink of an eye, the images you see are taken only millisecond after the drill was turned on. To capture the moment, where the paint forms that distinctive shape, I connected a sensor to the drill, which sends an impulse to the flashes. These specialized units are capable of creating flashes as short as a 1/40000 of a second, freezing the motion of the paint’.

Wait a minute, shouldn’t black holes be called rainbow holes if they started looking like these?