August 12, 2014

mymodernmet:

England-based photographer Martin Kimbell uses long exposures and special lighting techniques to create spectacular light trails set against lovely landscapes. To capture each gorgeous spectacle, Kimbell attaches LED lights to a hoop and then tosses it up in the air to document the movement.

August 11, 2014
mitsurugireiji:

fasteronfire525:

xbeatrce:

It’s important that people see this

I dont even know who this is, but the media pulls shit like this often and it should be publicized.

mark duggan was the young man shot to death by the met police here in london, and whose murder, now ruled controversially as ‘legal’, sparked the summer riots a few years back.

mitsurugireiji:

fasteronfire525:

xbeatrce:

It’s important that people see this

I dont even know who this is, but the media pulls shit like this often and it should be publicized.

mark duggan was the young man shot to death by the met police here in london, and whose murder, now ruled controversially as ‘legal’, sparked the summer riots a few years back.

(via bohemianarthouse)

August 10, 2014

qyon:

HAHAHAHAHAHAH THIS IS MY FAV PHOTO SET EVER HAHAHAHAHAHA

(Source: pleatedjeans, via bohemianarthouse)

August 6, 2014
lostateminor:

>
The most famous monkey selfie of all time is now the subject of a legal battle with Wikipedia

From the ‘you can’t script it’ category comes this somewhat bizarre story about a pending legal entanglement between a clever monkey, a photographer, and Wikipedia. It all started back in 2011 when nature photographer David Slater had his equipment, erm, borrowed by a rather forthright primate who proceeded to take hundreds of selfies, including the ubiqitious one above which has since been adopted by Wikipedia in its Wikimedia Commons collection.
Slater requested they remove the image only to be advised by Wikipedia that they wouldn’t as it was technically the monkey who pushed the button on the camera to take the photo, not the David Slater himself. ‘But it was his camera, sir?’ Nope, according to Wikipedia, the copyright is legally held by the monkey, who, strangely enough, hasn’t had much to say about the proceedings.
Now the UK’s Telegraph are reporting that it’ll cost Slater an estimated £10,000 in legal fees to take the matter to court. All the while, Wikipedia remain unrepentant. Talk about taking the monkey!

lostateminor:

>

The most famous monkey selfie of all time is now the subject of a legal battle with Wikipedia

image

From the ‘you can’t script it’ category comes this somewhat bizarre story about a pending legal entanglement between a clever monkey, a photographer, and Wikipedia. It all started back in 2011 when nature photographer David Slater had his equipment, erm, borrowed by a rather forthright primate who proceeded to take hundreds of selfies, including the ubiqitious one above which has since been adopted by Wikipedia in its Wikimedia Commons collection.

Slater requested they remove the image only to be advised by Wikipedia that they wouldn’t as it was technically the monkey who pushed the button on the camera to take the photo, not the David Slater himself. ‘But it was his camera, sir?’ Nope, according to Wikipedia, the copyright is legally held by the monkey, who, strangely enough, hasn’t had much to say about the proceedings.

Now the UK’s Telegraph are reporting that it’ll cost Slater an estimated £10,000 in legal fees to take the matter to court. All the while, Wikipedia remain unrepentant. Talk about taking the monkey!

August 6, 2014

escapekit:

Disintegrating

Photographer Fabian Oefner dismantles each car completely, from the body shell to the smallest screws, then photographs them piece by piece in a specific position to obtain the illusion of an exploding car.

(Source: fabianoefner.com)

July 14, 2014

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Bruce Evans

Suburban Noir

1. Heads Up

2. Home Coming

3. Good Neighbors

4. Illumination

5. Suburban Mushrooms

6. The Key

7. Morning Paper

July 11, 2014

minusmanhattan:

7 Days of Garbage by Gregg Segal features Americans laying in a week’s worth of their own garbage.

June 21, 2014
good:

Northwestern, South Dakota
This is Sean Casey’s TIV which means Tornado Intercept Vehicle we crossed paths in Mitchell, SD after a long tornado filled day. Sean has spent many years placing his home made armored vehicle directly in the path of tornados in order to film with his IMAX camera. -@CamilleSeaman http://ift.tt/1pjEYYa

good:

Northwestern, South Dakota

This is Sean Casey’s TIV which means Tornado Intercept Vehicle we crossed paths in Mitchell, SD after a long tornado filled day. Sean has spent many years placing his home made armored vehicle directly in the path of tornados in order to film with his IMAX camera. -@CamilleSeaman http://ift.tt/1pjEYYa

June 8, 2014

staticdiplomat:

onlylolgifs:

Magnetic Levitation Device

What is this wizardry

(via cyberflesh)

June 4, 2014
lostateminor:

>
This surreal photoshoot was done underwater on a ship wreck in Bali

Seven divers, two models, a 50-year old underwater shipwreck off the coast off Bali. How much more badass could a photoshoot get? But for Montreal-based photographer and director Benjamin Von Wong, who is known for his outrageous photoshoot concepts, it’s all part of a day’s work.
At first glance, the surreal images might look like they’re a product of some pretty rad photo manipulation, but actually, they’re the result of a challenging process Wong and his crew had to go through. Starting with his crew, he had to get seven certified divers, as well as two models who were trained freedivers. Anyone who’s been in the water, let alone 25 meters below it, knows this is no easy task. As for the ship wreck, he had to get a special permit to use the underwater site.
It gets harder from there. Since the seawater would permanently damage the fancy dresses worn in the shoot, Wong had to find a designer willing to permanently part with their creations. Due to underwater conditions, Wong was limited to using natural light, all the while giving instructions to his team and ensuring the safety of his models.
The results of this risky and dangerous photoshoot are images that only the wildest of imaginations could conjure. Images of beautiful sea goddesses, with their dresses and flowy hair flowing amongst the battered remains of a sunken ship. Through the daring efforts of one photographer and his crew, we get to see an enchanting realm under the depths of the ocean.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-bFVpdtvZY

lostateminor:

>

This surreal photoshoot was done underwater on a ship wreck in Bali

image

Seven divers, two models, a 50-year old underwater shipwreck off the coast off Bali. How much more badass could a photoshoot get? But for Montreal-based photographer and director Benjamin Von Wong, who is known for his outrageous photoshoot concepts, it’s all part of a day’s work.

At first glance, the surreal images might look like they’re a product of some pretty rad photo manipulation, but actually, they’re the result of a challenging process Wong and his crew had to go through. Starting with his crew, he had to get seven certified divers, as well as two models who were trained freedivers. Anyone who’s been in the water, let alone 25 meters below it, knows this is no easy task. As for the ship wreck, he had to get a special permit to use the underwater site.

It gets harder from there. Since the seawater would permanently damage the fancy dresses worn in the shoot, Wong had to find a designer willing to permanently part with their creations. Due to underwater conditions, Wong was limited to using natural light, all the while giving instructions to his team and ensuring the safety of his models.

The results of this risky and dangerous photoshoot are images that only the wildest of imaginations could conjure. Images of beautiful sea goddesses, with their dresses and flowy hair flowing amongst the battered remains of a sunken ship. Through the daring efforts of one photographer and his crew, we get to see an enchanting realm under the depths of the ocean.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-bFVpdtvZY